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The Federation of Heathfields Infant and Wilnecote Junior SchoolsACHIEVING AND GROWING TOGETHER WITH PRIDE

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Creative

Our Topic is "wriggle and crawl". We are looking at minibeasts.

Minibeasts are ‘small creatures’, like worms, snails, insects and spiders. The scientific term for them is ‘invertebrates’ – a creature without a backbone.

Because they don’t have a backbone, minibeasts tend to have other structures which support and protect them. Snails have shells, while many insects and spiders have an ‘exoskeleton’, which is a hard casing on their outside.

There are over 25,000 minibeast species in Britain.

Facts of the day:

  1. The colour and appearance of minibeasts are key to their survival. Many minibeasts have very good camouflage, blending them into their environment so that they can hide from predators or creep up on prey. Other minibeasts, like the monarch butterfly, have bright colours to warn predators that they are either poisonous or might taste disgusting.
  2. Most minibeasts tend to use their senses of smell, touch and taste to experience the world around them, rather than their sight or hearing. They use features such as antennae, small hairs or taste receptors to do this.

 

Key words of the day:

Arthropod: a large group of creatures which have a segmented body; many jointed legs and an exoskeleton. Insects, spiders, molluscs and myriapods are all arthropods.
Camouflage: when a creature has specific colourings, shape and texture that allow it to blend into its habitat. Camouflage helps creatures to hide from predators, or enables them to creep up on prey.
Metamorphosis: a process of change that often occurs during a minibeast’s lifecycle (for example, when a caterpillar turns into a butterfly).

 

Today you could;

Design your own minibeast and label them. Can you write what their key features and characteristics are?

 

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