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The Federation of Heathfields Infant and Wilnecote Junior SchoolsACHIEVING AND GROWING TOGETHER WITH PRIDE

Welcome toThe Federation of Heathfields Infant and Wilnecote Junior SchoolsACHIEVING AND GROWING TOGETHER WITH PRIDE

Pupil Premium

Pupil Premium is an amount of money given to schools each year by the Government to improve the attainment of disadvantaged children. Pupil Premium is intended to directly benefit the children who are eligible, helping to narrow the gap between them and their classmates.

 

Children who are eligible for Pupil Premium:

 

  • Children in Reception to Year 6 who are, or have ever been, entitled to free school meals (£1320 per child, per school year).
  • Children in care (£2300 per child, per school year).
  • Children previously in care who have been adopted, or who have a special guardianship order, a child arrangements order or a residence order (£2300 per child, per school year).
  • Children from service families (£300 per child, per school year).

Pupil Premium Strategy Statement 2018 - 2019

with outcomes

 

Wilnecote Junior School

 Academic Year

2018-2019

Total PP budget

£95,220

Date of most recent PP review

October 2019

Total number of pupils

305

Number of pupils eligible

68

Date for next internal review of this strategy

April 2020

 

Historic Summary

2015-2016

2016-2017

2017-2018

Total number of pupil premium on roll

265

273

291

Total number of pupils eligible for PP

75

70

76

Total percentage of pupils eligible

28.3%

25.6%

26.1%

Total amount received for PP

£99,000

£89,340

£96,240

 

Attainment for end of Key Stage 2 Cohort 2017-2018

Pupils eligible for PP

School Data

National

Reading (SATs – expected/+)

53%

54%

75%

Writing

42%

51%

78%

Maths

37%

41%

76%

Reading (SATs – higher standard)

5%

14%

28%

Writing

5%

12%

20%

Maths

11%

4%

24%

 

 

Previously identified barriers to future attainment (based on 2018 SATs as well as internal data)

Desired Outcome

Impact and next steps

Internal barriers (issues to be addressed in school)

A

Attainment for maths, reading, writing and SPaG is not in line with national expectations.

 

 

 

The gap between PP and non PP compared to national will have been narrowed in all year groups compared to 2018 SATs.

 

Progress data will suggest that PP will be progressing at the same rate as non PP

Year 3

Previously PP children have made accelerated progress in maths and writing. This year they have made accelerated progress in reading. The impact of the NPQML and NPQSL training is clear in English. This year, we will fund the training for the maths leads in order to see the same results.

 

Year 4

There has been accelerated progress made in reading. Progress in maths and writing is in line with non PP. Again this indicates that the training the English leaders have received has been beneficial.

 

Year 5

The gap between PP and Non PP has been narrowed in reading however this is not the case in maths or writing.

 

Year 6

PP children are progressing at the same rate as non PP in Maths, reading and writing and in maths there has been accelerated progress. The increased rigour around pupil progress meetings as lead by the seniors has resulted in improvements for all children as well as PP.

B

Emotional well-being impacting on pupil’s ability to access the curriculum

Pupil’s receiving support will be able to use learnt strategies to manage their emotions so they are able to cope and are able to learn. Evidence of this will be seen through progress made towards BOXALL targets.

 

There will be an improvement in parental and pupil voice in terms of their opinions regarding meeting individual needs. Evidence of this will come from testimonials, yearly dispositions surveys. 

 

Improvement in attendance. Evidence will come from successful attendance improvement plans, success through multiagency working as well the percentage of those classed as persistently absent reducing.

 

There will be a decrease in the time some pupils need to self- regulate, which in turn will increase the amount of learning the pupil is engaging in.

 

Recent CMI visit from Steve Cartlidge, 16.10.19 shares the views of the senior leaders, “Learning walks continue to demonstrate pupil’s enthusiasm to learn and are willing to co-operate at all times.” The SEF now judges behaviour as well as personal development to be good, this has been validated by Steve on his most recent visits.

 

Parental surveys suggest a significant improvement of 20% in strengthening perceptions from agree to strongly agree in terms of how well the school meets the individual needs of their children. There was also a significant improvement of 10% in perceptions of the standard of behaviour in school. Parents feel that lessons are disrupted much less as there has been a doubling in the positive response rate this year.

 

 

C

Limited life experiences and opportunities impacting upon progress in non-core subjects

Pupils have access to trips and other life experiences which in turn improves their access to the curriculum. This will be demonstrated by the pupil’s ability to draw on enriched life experiences in the classroom, particularly in topic books.

Pupil surveys again show that the residential trips and other educational visits are the most valued and memorable experiences the children have in school and that these experiences make a huge contribution to the curriculum offer.

 

Monitoring of topic books show evidence of how the educational visits have been used to supplement the classroom learning to great effect.

External barriers (Issues which also require action outside of school)

 

D

PP pupils low attendance

Improvement in attendance. Evidence will come from successful attendance improvement plans, success through multiagency working as well the percentage of those classed as persistently absent reducing. Relationships with parents and school will show improvement through parents’ willingness to communicate with school and by following school policy.

There has been an improvement in attendance for PP children from 93.45% to 94.05%. The gap between PP and Non PP has decreased from 3.32% to 2.89%. This is indicative of consistent procedures and support which in place from all of our children and has also resulted in the whole school attendance improving from 96% to 96.4%.

E

Uniform – having the right uniform and P.E kit in order to fully participate in the curriculum

Pupils will be given uniform in order that they can fully participate in all P.E lessons as well as feeling truly part of the school community. Evidence of this will come through pupil voice and tracking of engagement in P.E lessons.

During the academic year, we have given out around 10 P.E kits. Pupil voice indicates that P.E is extremely popular and that children like to take part. The uptake of sporting competitions continues to be high. Further investment in monitoring children who frequently forget their kit could be useful to ensure maximum participation.

F

Families have other barriers which prevent them from fully supporting their child’s education

Families working with the family liaison officer have improved attendance or improved engagement in lessons. External agencies have been referred to and are supporting families alongside school.  

In the last six months, 29 families of individual children have been referred for tier 2 support.

 

School are involved in TAF, CIN and CPP plans for __ families.

 

These interventions help us to develop positive relationships with parents and in turn supports the children with their learning.  

G

PP pupils do not have their learning supported as well as their non-PP counterparts, particularly with home reading. This is impacting on their progress.

Increase in the time spent reading to develop a love of reading. Evidence of this will be seen in pupil voice as well as progress data for reading.  

Reading data suggests that this has been successful. Tracking of home reading shows that the vast majority of children read at home and where this is not the case, interventions in school have been put into place.

 

Planned expenditure 2018-2019

The three headings below enable schools to demonstrate how they are using pupil premium to improve classroom pedagogy, provide targeted support and support whole school strategies.

  1. Quality of teaching for all

Barrier

Desired outcome

Action/Approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff Lead

When will you review

B

 

All staff understand the importance of mental well-being and use the shared strategies to support it. The waves programme gives all children access to tiered support.

Imagine Inclusion (Marni) - One day training - Promoting Mental Health & Wellbeing 

Emotional well-being is an identified barrier to progress for all of our children. Evidence from the EEF suggests that until children are emotionally ready to learn, then they will not be able to reach their full potential.

SENDCo to monitor the usage of the tiered nurture programme.

 

Monitoring of the quality of PSHE lessons

 

B.H SENDCo SLT S.R G.H

April 2019

Behaviour Training

Mental Health in Schools

New PSHE curriculum

Autism Outreach Training

Behaviour support training

Choices counselling training – listening skills and anger management

A

 

Training for English leaders directly impacts the quality of teaching and learning

Supply costs to cover middle leadership programmes such as NPQML, NPQSL

 

CMI visits at the end of the academic year 2017-2018 identified that the teaching of reading and writing needed improvement

Progress data

 

Evidence from monitoring of books, planning and lessons

 

 

English leaders E.H R.B

April 2019

Raising boys achievement course

Talk for writing

A

Senior leaders have a clear understanding of what is required to improve teaching and learning, a robust monitoring cycle as well as coaching and CPD cycle is in place to achieve this.

Senior leaders use dedicated leadership days to triangulate evidence and evaluate the SEF and SDP termly to ensure that rapid progress is made to improve standards of teaching and learning

CMI visits at the end of the academic year 2017-2018 identified that more rigorous monitoring of the quality of teaching and learning needed to take place in order to improve standards.

Lesson observations

 

Teacher profiles

SLT K.W S.R G.H

April 2019

Budgeted cost

£10,000

  1. Targeted support

Barrier

Desired outcome

Action/Approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff Lead

When will you review

A B

To ensure that individual needs are met. Challenging behaviour does not negatively impact upon the rest of the class group

1:1 support for 2 children who are awaiting EHCPs

1:1 support for 2 other children whose families have social services involvement

When these children are not sufficiently supported, the other children’s education is severely impacted.

Behaviour tracking of the children being supported.

 

Lesson observations and learning walks identify that classes are not disrupted.

S.R

April 2019

 

 

Provide support to prevent fixed term exclusion and permanent exclusion

Therapeutic support through the District Inclusion Partnership

Children’s educational outcomes are better if they are able to remain in mainstream education. We will always support those children who are at risk of exclusion.

Evaluation of PSP plans

 

Behaviour tracking

K.W S.R

D

Improved attendance percentages. Improvements in communication with parents regarding attendance. Successful attendance improvement plans.  

Attendance support which offers parents the opportunity to discuss barriers to good attendance as well as being able to explain the consequences of poor attendance.

Children cannot achieve well if they are not attending well.

Analysis of impact on attendance improvement plans.

 

Attendance data

S.R K.B

BF

Families who are vulnerable are able to access the right support for them and to be able to work in partnership with school

Family support which offers the opportunity for parents to talk to school and be referred to other agencies for specific support.

Families who are reluctant to engage with school often have other vulnerabilities which need supporting. If we can get to the root cause and support families in the right way, parental partnership can be really successful.

Tracking of referrals to different agencies

 

Parental/pupil voice

 

Impacts attendance

K.B

B

Children with additional needs have sufficient support at lunchtime which enables them to develop social skills

Two inclusion support workers run a lunchtime club, which gives our vulnerable pupils somewhere safe and calm to eat their lunch. They also have the opportunity to develop their social skills through playing games.

EEF research suggests that behaviour interventions improve pupils’ ability to self-regulate. This means less time is wasted in lessons dealing with problematic behaviours.

Behaviour tracking for individuals shows improvement over time.

 

Behaviour incidents at lunchtime remain low.

S.R

BF

Pupil’s well-being needs are met. Pupils learn strategies to be able to self-regulate and manage their emotions as well as developing self confidence and self-esteem, which directly impact on their attitudes to learn and the progress they make.

Pupil support

Boxall profiles show improvements towards targets.

 

Observations of pupils using the self –regulation stations and other strategies they have been taught during these sessions.

K.B M.P M.W

B

Wave 2

B

Wave 3

B

As a result of this support, Children have an improved ability to manage their emotions, enabling them improved access to the curriculum as well as a reduction in behaviour incidents.   

Choices Counselling Service

Pupil voice

 

Case studies show improvements in behaviour, socialisation and concentration

K.B S.R

B

Staff members have had sufficient training to be able to support emotional and social needs

Nurture group training

Staff who had CPD will be confident to support children with their individual needs.

Monitoring of the Waves provision

B.H SENDCo

Mental Health first aid training

Sensory Classroom training

Counselling Skills

A

 

To ensure that progress for LAC children is at least expected.

1:1 Tutoring for LAC children

LAC often struggle to reach their academic potential. Good quality provision can make up the gap between their potential and what they are capable of.

Data for LAC children shows impact of tutoring

G.H

 

Budgeted cost

£52535.03

  1. Other approaches

Barrier

Desired outcome

Action/Approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff Lead

When will you review /Cost

C

Pupils have the opportunity to learn a skill, which could turn into a life-long passion or talent.

Music Tuition

Pupil’s eligible for pupil premium do not always have the same life experiences and opportunities.

Staff to monitor uptake of lessons

D.M

April 2019

C

Pupils have the opportunity to visit and take part in activities which broaden their understanding of the world and raise their aspirations for themselves.

Educational visits

Staff to ensure that parents are aware that school can help with contributions and payment for residential trips.

D.M

April 2019

Budgeted cost

£1200

 

 

Pupil Premium Report 2017 – 2018 (Academic Year)            Heathfields Infant School

 

The Pupil Premium is funding provided to schools which is additional to the main school funding. It is allocated according to the number of pupils on-roll who have been eligible for free school meals (FSM) within the past 6years. A smaller amount is delegated according to the number of children of service families, and an allocation for each pupil who is ‘Looked After’ (in care).

 

It is for schools to decide how the Pupil Premium is spent since they are best placed to assess what additional provision should be made for the pupils within their responsibility. However, schools are held accountable for how they have used the additional funding to support pupils who qualify for Pupil Premium funding. Please see below information regarding how Pupil Premium was spent in the last academic year, the impact of its funding and the future plans (next steps).

 

Area of need

Intervention/Description

Amount

Desired Impact

Intervention

Various small group intervention for English (reading, writing and speaking and listening skills) and Maths. In class support across the school

£4,000

For all children to be able to have a good pencil grip and sit correctly in lessons. For children to develop their fine gross motor skills and write in a fluid style.

For children to make 3 points progress over the year.

For the gap between the PP and Non PP to be narrowed.

A greater percentage of PP children to reach greater depth at end of KS1.

Inclusion

Family support worker

£6,000

For all children to have a named person for advice and support (improve the attendance and well being of the PP children and family environment)

For the early access of help from multi agencies to be taken up.

For children to be in school for atleast 96% of the year. (The gap between the Non PP and PP to be reduced)

Social and emotional wellbeing and support

Small group interventions – colour therapy, SALT groups, fine and gross motor skills and nurture sessions

£2,155

For all PP children to feel happy and safe in school.

For all PP to have barriers identified and removed from them earlier. All children to have personalised targets recorded and monitored on SIMs

For PP to develop the skills of growth mindest – I can do. Increase the positiveness and aspirations of the children.

 

 

Breakdown of PP  pupils at the  school

2017-2018

Total number of pupils on roll

221

Total % of pupil eligible for PP

5.8%

Total amount received for PP

£12,155

 

Wilnecote Junior School

Pupil Premium Allocation 2017 – 2018

 

The Pupil Premium is funding provided to schools which is additional to the main school funding. It is allocated according to the number of pupils on-roll who have been eligible for free school meals (FSM) within the past 6years. A smaller amount is delegated according to the number of children of service families, and an allocation for each pupil who is ‘Looked After’ (in care).

 

It is for schools to decide how the Pupil Premium is spent since they are best placed to assess what additional provision should be made for the pupils within their responsibility. However, schools are held accountable for how they have used the additional funding to support pupils who qualify for Pupil Premium funding. Please see below information regarding how Pupil Premium was spent in the last academic year, the impact of its funding and the future plans (next steps).

 

Area of need

Intervention/Description

Amount

Impact

Mental health and well-being which impacts upon attendance and achievement.

 

Early interventions include:

Nurture group

Lunchtime support

Small group intervention

 

Intensive interventions:

1:1 positive play

1:1 support in lessons

1:1 support at lunchtime

Supporting families

Equine counselling sessions

 

 

£80,497 to be spent on teaching assistant salaries. The support is used flexibly over the year to be able to be reactive to the needs of the individuals.

 Pupil’s behaviour has improved in school with far fewer children at risk of exclusion.

 

The percentage of Pupil Premium pupils achieving ARE is above national data and Staffordshire results, which is extremely pleasing. Please see the data summaries below for further detail.

 

Progress in maths and writing are at least at the expected standard and where reading is less than expected this is very close at 2.9 (expected progress is 3). Please see the data summaries below for further detail.

 

Child protection cases are being well manged and information logged role of the family liaison officer, in one case the information shared with social services led to the removal of the children from the family home.

 

Numerous cases were referred to school nurse, local support team and social services for further support.

 

Children have received 1:1 support in lessons and at lunchtime which has helped to ensure that these children continue to access the learning and are able to engage.

External intervention

Malachi

 

Our support worker offers 1:1 support for children and their families giving bespoke counselling using a wide range of techniques include talking therapy and roleplay therapy.

£4982

__ children have now worked with our support worker, with __ being discharged from his support sue to the improve in the children’s ability to manage their behaviours allowing them to fully engage with their learning.

To develop strategies to manage challenging behaviour in order to reintegrate back into the mainstream setting fulltime.

External intervention Cornerpost

 

 

£425

The opportunity to develop strategies away from school has meant that time spent back in school has been calm, allowing this child to develop positive relationships with staff which will help him to return to school full time in the near future.

To provide consistent education for children who are unable to attend a mainstream setting.

External intervention

1:1 tutoring

£1312.50

To allow continual access to education.

 

 

Breakdown of PP  pupils at the  school

 

Total number of pupils on roll

293

Total % of pupil eligible for PP

27.3%

Total amount received for PP

£87,216.50

 

Pupil Premium Progress Summary

Year Gp

 

No of chn

Points Progress

Autumn Term

 

Exceeding é

Expected –

Below Expected ê

Points Progress

Spring Term

Exceeding é

Expected –

Below Expected ê

Points Progress

Summer Term

Exceeding é

Expected –

Below Expected ê

 

3

M

22

1.6

é

2.7

é

3.2

é

 

R

22

1.5

é

2.7

é

3

 

W

22

1.6

é

2.8

é

3.2

é

4

M

13

1.5

é

2.1

é

3.1

é

 

R

13

1.8

é

2.5

é

3.1

é

 

W

13

1.4

é

2.4

é

3.2

é

5

M

20

1.5

é

2.4

é

2.9

ê

 

R

20

1.8

é

2.3

é

2.6

ê

 

W

20

1.6

é

2.1

é

2.6

ê

6

M

17

1.6

é

2.3

é

3.2

é

 

R

17

2

é

2.3

é

3

 

W

17

1.6

é

2.2

é

3.1

é

 

 

 

Whole School Pupil Premium Progress Summary

 

 

No of chn

Points Progress

 

Exceeding é

Expected –

Below Expected ê

Points Progress

Exceeding é

Expected –

Below Expected ê

Points Progress

Exceeding é

Expected –

Below Expected ê

 

 

M

72

1.6

é

2.5

é

3.1

é

 

R

72

1.8

é

2.4

é

2.9

ê

 

W

72

1.6

é

2.5

é

3

-

 

Pupil Premium Attainment Summary

 

Year Gp

 

No of chn

At ARE

Sept 2016

On track to meet ARE January 2017

(SS)

Diff

Sept to January 2017

é ê

On track to meet ARE April 2017

Diff Sept to April

é ê

 

On track to meet ARE July 2017

Diff Sept to July

é ê

 

National PP

ARE

38%

é ê

Staffs

PP ARE

33%

é ê

3

M

22

60%

55% (59%)

ê

60% (72%)

.-     (é)

54% (75%)

ê (é)

é (é)

é (é)

 

R

22

59%

54% (45%)

ê

56% (64%)

ê (é)

46% (71%)

ê (é)

é (é)

é (é)

 

W

22

45%

55% (55%)

é

48% (68%)

é (é)

39% (71%)

ê (é)

é (é)

é (é)

4

M

13

46%

62% (62%)

é

53% (60%)

ê (ê)

57% (79%)

é (é)

é (é)

é (é)

 

R

13

46%

77% (69%)

é

60% (67%)

ê (ê)

64% (71%)

é (é)

é (é)

é (é)

 

W

13

46%

62% (69%)

é

50% (73%)

ê (é)

64% (79%)

é (é)

é (é)

é (é)

5

M

20

10%

30% (50%)

é

30% (50%)

- (ê)

37% (37%)

é (é)

ê (ê)

é (é)

 

R

20

15%

60% (50%)

é

40% (45%)

ê (ê)

32% (53%)

é (é)

é (é)

é (é)

 

W

20

10%

55% (60%)

é

45% (50%)

ê (ê)

26% (37%)

é (é)

é (é)

é (é)

6

M

17

53%

71% (47%)

é

24% (41%)

ê (ê)

65% (53%)

é (-)

é (é)

é (é)

 

R

17

59%

65% (59%)

é

47% (71%)

ê (é)

71% (65%)

é (é)

é (é)

é (é)

 

W

17

47%

65% (65%)

é

35% (71%)

ê (é)

71% (77%)

é (é)

é (é)

é (é)

 

Whole School Pupil Premium Attainment Summary

 

 

No of chn

At ARE

Sept 2016

On track to meet ARE January 2017

(SS)

Diff

Sept to January 2017

é ê

On track to meet ARE April 2017

Diff Sept to April

é ê

 

On track to meet ARE July 2017

Diff Sept to July

é ê

 

National PP

ARE

38%

é ê

Staffs

PP ARE

33%

é ê

 

M

72

42%

53% (50%)

é

42% (59%)

ê (é)

40% (61%)

ê  (é)

é (é)

é (é)

 

R

72

44%

64% (61%)

é

52% (61%)

ê (-)

40% (65%)

ê  (é)

é (é)

é (é)

 

W

72

35%

59% (63%)

é

47% (65%)

ê(é)

48% (68%)

é  (é)

é (é)

é (é)

 

Pupil Premium Report 2016 – 2017                             Heathfields Infant School

 

Area of need

Intervention/Description

Amount

Impact

Intervention

Various small group intervention for English (reading, writing and speaking and listening skills) and Maths. In class support across the school

£10,000

Maths interventions; 12/19 targets were met.

Reading interventions; 25/31 targets were met.

Writing interventions;14/20 targets were met.

 

Age related expectations - Maths;

Reception – 75%

Year 1 – 80%

Year 2 – 57%

Age related expectations - Reading;

Reception – 63%

Year 1 -80%

Year 2 – 57%

Age related expectations - Writing;

Reception – 50%

Year 1 – 60%

Year 2 – 43%

Inclusion

Family support worker

£6,000

Support provided to teachers, pupils and parents. Engagement with 12 families was gained.

Social and emotional wellbeing and support

Small group interventions – colour therapy, SALT groups, fine and gross motor skills and nurture sessions

£7,940

Nurture and social and emotional wellbeing interventions; 14/15 targets were met.

 

 

 

Breakdown of PP  pupils at the  school

2016-2017

Total number of pupils on roll

221

Total % of pupil eligible for PP

10.4%

Total amount received for PP

£23,940

 

Pupil Premium

Heathfields Infant School & Wilnecote Junior School

Pupil Premium Report 2015-2016

 

The Pupil Premium is funding provided to schools which is additional to the main school funding. It is allocated according to the number of pupils on-roll who have been eligible for free school meals (FSM) within the past 6years. A smaller amount is delegated according to the number of children of service families, and an allocation for each pupil who is ‘Looked After’ (in care).

 

It is for schools to decide how the Pupil Premium is spent since they are best placed to assess what additional provision should be made for the pupils within their responsibility. However, schools are held accountable for how they have used the additional funding to support pupils who qualify for Pupil Premium funding. Please see below information regarding how Pupil Premium was spent in the last academic year, the impact of its funding and the future plans (next steps).

 

From September 2015 until August 2016 the school received £1,320 for each eligible pupil.

 

Pupil Premium Funding 2015/2016 academic year

Pupils Eligible for Free School Meals (last 6 years)

72 @£1,320

£95,040

Pupils from Service Families

 

£300

Pupils in Local Authority Care

 

£2000

 

Allocation of Funding 2015/2016 Academic Year

  • Advanced Skills Teaching Assistant – targeted support
  • Proportion of Assisstant SENDCo salary – targeted intervention and support
  • Purchasing of resources to improve reading standards
  • Funding alternative education provision and transport
  • Purchasing of specific exercise books for English and Maths
  • Subsidising of school trips for eligible pupils
  • Funding for Teaching Assistant support delivering bespoke curriculum and intervention
  • Provision of lunch time club to give variety of extended learning opportunities

 

Impact of Funding 2015/2016 Academic Year

 

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

 

PP

Non-PP

PP

Non-PP

PP

Non-PP

PP

Non-PP

Maths

3dev+

3sec

4dev+

4dev

5dev+

5sec

6dev+

6dev+

Reading

3dev+

3sec

4dev+

4sec

5dev+

5sec

6dev+

6dev+

Writing

3dev+

3sec

4dev+

4dev+

5exc

5sec

6dev+

6dev+

  • Social, emotional and self-esteem improved for those children receiving bespoke curriculum; attitudes to learning improved
  • Attendance at alternative educational provision provided support for eligible children at risk of Exclusion
  • Effectiveness of assessments of learning/social emotional needs and referrals to external agencies improved leading to quicker access to specialised external support
  • Engagement in extracurricular activities and residential which developed confidence, and life skills

 

Expected Pupil Premium Funding 2016/2017 academic year

Pupils Eligible for Free School Meals (last 6 years)

75 @£1,320

£99,000

Pupils from Service Families

 

£300

Pupils in Local Authority Care

 

£2000

 

Planned use of Funding 2016/2017 Academic Year

  • Purchasing of mathematics resources to enhance provision and improve differentiated opportunities
  • Professional Training for intervention support
  • Advanced Skills Teaching Assistant salary – targeted support reading and maths
  • Proportion of Assistant SENDCo salary – assessment and targeted support
  • Teaching assistant and support staff to deliver quality wave 3 intervention – basic skills
  • Training and CPD for staff to ensure quality of provision for learners
  • Funds to support extra-curricular activities.

 

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